5-16 August 2019
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
US/Central timezone


Tours and tutorials

 

INSS2019 attendees will have an opportunity to visit four world-leading experiments and facilities situated at the lab, led by guides who are currently working on those projects. They will also be offered the opportunity to attend a tutorial session specifically designed to help young researchers develop important skills.

 

D0 and Tevatron

For over two decades, the CDF and DZero experiments took data at the energy frontier at the Tevatron collider. The DZero detector remains largely intact. This tour includes stops at the DZero assembly hall and control room, the Tevatron tunnel adjacent to the DZero detector, and culminates with the DZero detector and the collision hall.


Neutrino underground (NOvA, MINOS and MINERvA)

The NuMI beamline sends neutrino beams through detectors for several experiments, some of which are located in an underground area on-site. This tour takes attendees 300 feet down the access shaft to the NuMI tunnel and underground areas housing the MINERvA detector, and the near detectors for the MINOS and NOvA experiments.
 

SRF and SC Magnet Facilities

Fermilab is a leading center for the development of high gradient superconducting RF cavities to drive particle accelerators, and the high-field superconducting magnets used to control and contain high energy particle beams. This tour will visit several of the main facilities used in the research, development and production of these technologies. If time permits, the tour will include a visit some of the quantum information system research facilities, which rely on the SRF technologies developed at the lab.

 

Muon g-2 Experiment

The Muon g-2 experiment will make precision measurements of the magnetic moment of the muon with a precision that is a factor of four better than that of most precise measuremnts to date. This tour will take attendees to see the detectors and the precision storage ring that make it all possible.

 

Science Communication Tutorial

While most students and post-docs invest considerable effort in developing their research skills, they do not typically have opportunity to work on the skills needed to effectively communicate the product of their research to wide range of audiences they will face throughout their careers, which can span everything from domain experts to the lay public. The full value of the science we do is only realized if we can effectively explain it to each of these communities. In this tutorial, an expert in science communication will conduct exercises and offer guidance on how to we can best communicate our science.

 



Social events

 

Attendees will have an opportunity to attend the following events:

  • A welcome reception with light snacka and drinks
  • A bar-b-que dinner at the Kuhn Barn in the Fermilab Village
  • Special interest discussion on neutrinos and nuclear non-proliferation
  • A final school dinner at Two Brothers Roundhouse